Faculty Lecture Videos

Global Capitalism and Unevenness Rethought: Modern India
March 3, 2017
Professor Moishe Postone from the Department of History at the University of Chicago gives a talk on ‘Marx, Modernity and Temporality’ at UChicago Center in Delhi.

Connection Series: Literary Readings by Anne Waldman and Janice Pariat
January 16, 2017
Two celebrated poets Anne Waldman and Janice Pariat read best of their poetry at the UChicago Center in Delhi.

Crisis of Liberal Democracy: Some “Rudolphian” Reflections
January 12, 2017
Honoring the lives and scholarly contributions of Susanne Hoeber Rudolph and Lloyd Rudolph, the lecture was delivered by Dr. Pratap Bhanu Mehta, President, Center for Policy Research

Prejudice, Stigma, Discrimination: Combatting Exclusions Through Policy and Law
December 18, 2017
At the UChicago Center in Delhi, scholars and faculties from UChicago and other universities presented their papers on Prejudice, Stigma, and Discrimination.

Bilingual Literary Readings (Part 2)
Novermber 8, 2016
At the UChicago Center in Delhi, poets and translators came together and showcased their work in the languages of Hindi, Bangla and Urdu.

Bilingual Literary Readings (Part 1)
November 8, 2016
At the UChicago Center in Delhi, poets and translators came together and showcased their work in the languages of Hindi, Bangla and Urdu.

Clinical Medical Ethics at the University of Chicago: Applying Medical Humanism in Patient Care
November 4, 2016
At the UChicago Center in Delhi, Dr. Monica Peek shares data from various surveys and results of the patient care workshops conducted by her in Chicago.

Disarming Dialogues: Reviving Humanities in Medical Education (RHiME) 2016 Workshop (Part 3)
November 2, 2016
At the UChicago Center in Delhi, doctors & professors from UChicago and various Indian institutes gathered for three days conference on Reviving Humanities in Medical Education.

Disarming Dialogues: Reviving Humanities in Medical Education (RHiME) 2016 Workshop (Part 2)
November 2, 2016
At the UChicago Center in Delhi, doctors & professors from UChicago and various Indian institutes gathered for three days conference on Reviving Humanities in Medical Education.

Disarming Dialogues: Reviving Humanities in Medical Education (RHiME) 2016 Workshop
November 2, 2016
At the UChicago Center in Delhi, doctors & professors from UChicago and various Indian institutes gathered for three days conference on Reviving Humanities in Medical Education.

Urban Labs Innovation Challenge: Delhi Awards Announcement
September 21, 2016
At the UChicago Center in Delhi, winners of Urban Labs Innovation Challenge were announced and awarded.

Workshop on Cities, Climate Forcing and Infectious Disease Dynamics
September 13, 2016
At the UChicago Center in Delhi, presentations were given on Climate sensitive diseases in urban environments, a dynamical perspective.

Harnessing Open Data for Cities
September 12, 2016
At the UChicago Center in Delhi, Charlie Catlett and Pete Beckman deliver multiple sessions on Harnessing Open Data for Cities.  

Musicophilia in Mumbai & Four-Hand Piano Transcriptions and the Geographies of Musical Experience 
May 26, 2016
At the UChicago Center in Delhi, Thomas Christensen explored and illustrated the cultural phenomenon of four-hand piano transcriptions in 19th century Europe. Tejaswini Niranjana drew on a variety of sources to trace musicophilia in 20th century Mumbai. The event also featured a film screening by award winning filmmaker Surabhi Sharma.

Stuart Pimm: International importance of protected areas of India’s Biodiversity
May 11, 2016
At the UChicago Center in Delhi, Stuart Pimm talks about International importance of protected areas of India’s Biodiversity.

Biodiversity and the Evolution of the Ants: Talk by Corrie Moreau
May 10, 2016
At the UChicago Center in Delhi, Dr. Corrie Moreau shared her experience conducting field research around the world on the one of the most ecologically important groups of terrestrial animals and provide an overview of her work on inferring the evolution of Ants and the role that their gut bacteria play in their evolutionary success.

Dipesh Chakrabarty’s The Calling of History: Book Launch & Panel Discussion 
March 1, 2016
At the UChicago Center in Delhi, historian Dipesh Chakrabarty was joined by a distinguished panel at the launch of his book The Calling of History: Sir Jadunath Sarkar and his Empire of Truth. The Panel featured eminent historians Nayanjot Lahiri and Neeladri Bhattacharya and journalist Swapan Dasgupta and addressed broader questions about the discipline of history and public life drawing on contemporary debates and examples from the life and work of Sir Jadunath Sarkar, a leading historian of the Mughal period in India. The panel was moderated by renowned scholar Rudrangshu Mukherjee.

Thirteen Festivals: A Ritual Year in Bengal - Book Release & Lecture by The Prof. Ralf W. Nicholas. 
November 19, 2015
Jawhar Sircar, CEO of Prasar Bharti released Professor Ralph Nicholas's new book - Thirteen Festivals : A Ritual Year in Bengal - The book release was followed by a lecture by Professor Nicholas in collaboration with the American Institute of Indian Studies at UChicago Center in Delhi.

Two Poets with Cole Swensen and Rukmini Bhaya Nair 
November 18, 2015
At the UChicago Center in Delhi, renowned poets Cole Swensen and Rukmini Bhaya Nair read out a selection from their works and led a discussion on contemporary poetry.

Looking Askance 
October 27, 2015
Drawing on India’s long tradition of documentary photography, Looking Askance considers contemporary photographic works from the University of Chicago that respond to current events and media imagery. These works complicate what it means to “bear witness” by proposing a problematic relationship to the utopic premise that photographs can shift the social and political conditions they picture. The exhibition’s curator, acclaimed photographer Laura Letinsky, as well as two artists featured in the show, Anna Elise Johnson and Marco G. Ferrari, discuss photography’s relationship to the production and dissemination of historical truth. Casting suspicion on the possibility of an absolute historical narrative, these artists examine our shifting understanding of documentary photography. Presented by The University of Chicago Center in Delhi and Logan Center Exhibitions.

Kashmir and the Development of Tibetan Buddhism: Talk by Professor Matthew Kapstein  
October 6, 2015
Matthew T. Kapstein specializes in the history of Buddhist philosophy in India and Tibet, as well as in the cultural history of Tibetan Buddhism more generally. Kapstein has published over a dozen books and numerous articles, among the most recent of which are a general introduction to Tibetan cultural history, The Tibetans (Oxford 2006), an edited volume on Sino-Tibetan religious relations, Buddhism Between Tibet and China (Boston 2009), and a translation of an eleventh-century philosophical allegory in the acclaimed Clay Sanskrit Series, The Rise of Wisdom Moon (New York 2009). With Kurtis Schaeffer (University of Virginia) and Gray Tuttle (Columbia), he has completed Sources of Tibetan Traditions, published in the Columbia University Press Sources of Asian Traditions series in 2013.
Director of Tibetan Studies at the Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes in Paris and Numata Visiting Professor of Buddhist Studies at the University of Chicago’s Divinity School, Matthew T. Kapstein addressed aspects of the history of Buddhist philosophy and literature in Kashmir and their legacy in Tibet, illustrated with examples from the art of these lands.

Indian New Wave Cinema--Session 4 
August 29, 2015
The video features a workshop that took place following a year-long research project supported by the University of Chicago’s Center in Delhi with partnership with the Department of Cinema and Media Studies, University of Chicago, The Media lab, Jadavpur University and indiancine.ma.The video features a talk by Kaushik Bhaumik on “Doing Democracy? The film Collectives of the Indian New Wave” and by The Daniel Morgan on “To Make Films politically? Indian New Cinema and Global Debates on Form and Practice.”         

Indian New Wave Cinema--Session 3 
August 29, 2015 
The video features a workshop that took place following a year-long research project supported by the university of Chicago’s Center in Delhi with partnership with Cinema and Media Studies, University of Chicago, The Media lab, Jadavpur University and indiancine.ma.
It covers a talk by Rochona Majumdar, The University of Chicago on ‘’Anger and After: Mrinal Sen’s Calcutta Trilogy” and by Satish Poduval on “Waves of Revulsion:1975 and the New Malayalam Cinema.’’ 

Indian New Wave Cinema--Session 2 
August 29, 2015
The video features a workshop that took place following a year-long research project supported by the university of Chicago’s Center in Delhi with partnership with the Department of Cinema and Media Studies, University of Chicago, The Media lab, Jadavpur University and indiancine.ma. 
It covers a talk by Sangita Gopal, The University of Oregon, on “The Woman Question and the New Indian Cinema” and Madhav Prasad, English and Foreign languages University on “Urban Themes in Kannada New Cinema.” 

Indian New Wave Cinema--Session 1 
August 29, 2015
The video features a workshop that took place following a year-long research project supported by the university of Chicago’s Center in Delhi with partnership with Cinema and Media Studies, University of Chicago, The Media lab, Jadavpur University and indiancine.ma. 
This video features a talk by Ashish Rajadhyaksha (Center for Study in Culture and Society, Bengaluru) and Moinak Biswas (Jadavpur University, Kolkata) on “Political Debates and Film Polemics: 1969-1980” followed by a panel discussion.     

IIC CEL 
August 29, 2015
The video features a workshop that took place following a year-long research project supported by the university of Chicago’s Center in Delhi with partnership with Cinema and Media Studies, University of Chicago, The Media lab, Jadavpur University and indiancine.ma. 
This video features a talk by Ashish Rajadhyaksha (Center for Study in Culture and Society, Bengaluru) and Moinak Biswas (Jadavpur University, Kolkata) on “Political Debates and Film Polemics: 1969-1980” followed by a panel discussion.     

Measuring Impact
July 30, 2015
The International Innovation Corps (IIC) at the University of Chicago Harris School of Public Policy hosted a day-long workshop  to discuss challenges and best practices involved in implementing large scale, high impact solutions in India.
This video features representatives from international development agencies, industry experts and other prominent players that discussed issues related to measuring impact while scaling solutions and how to use impact measurements to inform future and current interventions.

IIC DMICDC 
July 30, 2015
The International Innovation Corps (IIC) at the University of Chicago Harris School of Public Policy hosted a day-long workshop  to discuss challenges and best practices with a range of prominent individuals and organizations involved in implementing large scale, high impact solutions in India.
The video features interactive sessions with IIC fellows (Urveel Shah, Neelakshi Rathore, Matthew Klein, Kaustubh Khare & Shivangi Jain) and a keynote speaker from IIC government partner Delhi-Mumbai Industrial Corridor Development Corporation (DMICDC).

IIC NSDC 
July 30, 2015
The International Innovation Corps (IIC) at the University of Chicago Harris School of Public Policy hosted a day-long workshop to discuss challenges and best practices with a range of prominent individuals and organizations involved in implementing large scale, high impact solutions in India.
The video features interactive sessions with IIC fellows (Jeremy Ziring, Shirley Yan, Karthik Sivaram & Ayesha Khan) and a keynote speaker from IIC government partner, National Skill Development Corporation.

IIC Last Mile Connectivity 
July 30, 2015 
The International Innovation Corps (IIC) at the University of Chicago Harris School of Public Policy hosted a day-long workshop  to discuss challenges and best practices involved in implementing large scale, high impact solutions in India.
This video features representatives from development agencies, private foundations and Government officials that focused their talks on how to ensure that successful piloted solutions are effectively rolled out in the region.

Philip Lutgendorf, PhD '87 on Chai Why: the making of the indian national drink 
July 15, 2015
This illustrated talk given on July 15, 2015, in collaboration with the American Institute of Indian Studies (AIIS), details the spread of tea drinking in 20th-century India. Drawing on both archival and field research, it focuses on the mass popularization of “chai” through changes in marketing and manufacturing, as well as in eating habits and social networks, giving special emphasis to the role played by advertising images in transmitting the “tea habit” to Indians, both before and after Independence in 1947.
Philip Lutgendorf holds BA and PhD degrees from the University of Chicago and is currently professor of Hindi and modern Indian studies in the Department of Asian and Slavic Languages and Literatures at the University of Iowa, where he has taught since 1985. His book on the performance of the Hindi Ramayana, “The Life of a Text” (University of California Press, 1991) won the A. K. Coomaraswamy Prize of the Association for Asian Studies. He received a Guggenheim Fellowship in 2002–03 for his research on the popular Hindu “monkey-god” Hanuman, which appeared as “Hanuman’s Tale, The Messages of a Divine Monkey” (Oxford University Press, 2007). His interests include epic performance traditions, folklore and popular culture, and mass media. Lutgendorf maintains a website devoted to popular Hindi cinema, a.k.a. “Bollywood” (http://www.uiowa.edu/indiancinema/). He is presently translating the “Ramcharitmanas” of Tulsidas for the Murty Classical Library of India and Harvard University Press, and writing on the popularization of chai in 20th-century India. He is president of the AIIS.

Philippe Guyot-Sionnest on Colloidal Nanoparticle Research 
June 23, 2015 
Philippe Guyot-Sionnest holds joint appointments as Professor in the Departments of Chemistry and Physics at the University of Chicago. He earned his PhD from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1987 after attending the Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau, France and the University of Paris-Sud, France. Guyot-Sionnest's awards include: 2002 Fellow, American Physical Society; 1992 David and Lucile Packard Fellow; and 1990 Prix National des Lasers, Sociètè Française de Physique.  His research focuses on the synthesis of colloidal plasmonic nanostructures with specific optical properties.

Krista Van Fleit Hang, PhD'06', on Mao & Gandhi in the Fight Against Corruption 
May 27, 2015 
Xi Jinping’s massive anticorruption crackdown and the Aam Aadmi Party’s victory in the recent Delhi elections highlight a shared frustration with corruption as India and China enter the Asian Century.  This talk examined the mobilization of state ideology in two popular anticorruption films from China and India, arguing that they look to assuage the social pains incurred by the increased pace of modernization and globalization by presenting citizens with nostalgic solutions based in the founding principles of each nation.  The 2006 Bollywood hit Lage Raho Munna Bhai, in which a gangster uses Gandhi’s philosophy of non-violence in order to solve problems, most of which arise from systemic corruption, started a wave of “Gandigiri” in India, ostensibly reminding Indian citizens what it means to follow the philosophies set out by the modern nation’s founding father.  In 2000, amongst a wave of Chinese anticorruption novels and television shows, the film Fatal Decision, detailing the corruption in a State Owned Enterprise, was for a short time the highest grossing domestic film.  Fatal Decision’s hero, the upright official Li Gaocheng, fights corruption even at the risk of losing his family and position in government, and ends the film with a speech that hails the spirit of socialism and urges his fellow officials to remember their roots.  Both films, popular with audiences and the state, avoid a systemic solution to the problem of corruption, choosing rather to focus on individual behavior and conservative nostalgia in the face of an uncertain future.
Krista Van Fleit Hang is Associate Professor of Chinese at the University of South Carolina where she teaches courses in modern/contemporary Chinese literature and film.  She received her Ph.D. from the University of Chicago in 2006.  Her first book, Literature the People Love: Reading Chinese Texts from the Early Maoist Period (1949-1966), was published in 2013.  Currently she is engaged in a comparative study of Hindi and Chinese cinema, focusing especially on national exchanges in the 1950s, as both countries were experimenting with a combination of socialist realist messages and melodramatic plots in picturing newly formed nations onscreen.  She is currently in Delhi with the support of a Fulbright-Nehru Academic and Professional Excellence award, and will spend the next academic year conducting research in China.

Authors Raj Kamal Jha & Vu Tran on Why We Tell Stories 
March 20, 2015
After an introduction by UChicago Center in Delhi Faculty Director Gary Tubb, authors Raj Kamal Jha and Vu Tran discussed “Why We Tell Stories: Finding your voice, the importance of plot, the choice of place in fiction.”
Vu Tran is an Assistant Professor of Practice in the Arts in the Department of English and the Committee on Creative Writing. A fiction writer, his work thus far is preoccupied with the legacy of the Vietnam War for the Vietnamese who remained in the homeland, the Vietnamese who immigrated to America, and the Americans whose lives have intersected with both. His first novel, Dragonfish, concerns an American police officer’s search in Las Vegas for his ex-wife, a Vietnamese refugee whose letters to the daughter she abandoned decades ago comprises the book’s secondary narrative. The unraveling of her mysterious disappearance also reveals characters grappling with who they are in light of what they’ve lost: kin, country, love, morals.
Raj Kamal Jha is Chief Editor of The Indian Express which has won the International Press Institute's India Award for Excellence in Journalism three times. His novels include The Blue Bedspread, shortlisted for the Guardian First Book Award, winner of the 2000 Commonwealth Writers' Prize for Best First Book (Eurasia) and a New York Times Notable Book of the Year; If You Are Afraid of Heights, a finalist for the Hutch–Crossword Book Award in 2003; and Fireproof, rated first in CNN–IBN's list of best books published in India in 2006. His novels have been translated into more than a dozen languages. He works in New Delhi and lives in Gurgaon.

Framing The Question of India : Honoring the Scholarly Legacy of Susanne & Lloyd Rudolph
March 17, 2015
Honoring the Scholarly legacy of Susanne and Llyod Rudolf at the UChicago Center in Delhi. Susanne and Llyod Rudolf were Emeritus Professors at the University of Chicago and the co-authors of Numerous influential works that earned them the 2014 Padma Bhushan and had impact on research in South Asia in the last 50 years.

Past for Sale 
March 16, 2015 
This conference brought together anthropologists, archaeologists, art historians, and cultural heritage scholars and activists to discuss contemporary threats to India’s ancient cultural patrimony. It was part of “The Past for Sale: New Approaches to the Study of Archaeological Looting,” a research project of the Neubauer Collegium for Culture and Society, and was co-sponsored by the South Asia Language and Area Center and the Center in Delhi, all of the University of Chicago. The video features a talk by Kathleen D. Morrison, Neukom Family Professor in the Department of Anthropology and the College, that focuses on the processes that lead to artifacts and artworks being sold on the international market without legal authorization. The event took place March 16, 2015, at the Center in Delhi.

Innovations and Turning Points: Towards a History of Kavya Literature 
March 15, 2015
At the UChicago Center in Delhi, noted Sanskrit scholars Yigal Bronner, David Shulman and Gary Tubb held a book discussion for their book Innovations and Turning Points: Towards a History of Kavya Literature. The book discussion was moderated by Professor Harish Trivedi and featured renowned Sanskritist Shri Ram Karan Sharma as the guest of honor. The discussion focused on the moments of breakthrough and innovation in Sanskrit literature.

Harper Lecture with Mark Philip Bradley:Defining Human Rights 
November 24, 2014 
Our consensus on what constitutes a human right dates back only to the 1940s, when the global human rights imagination first began to take shape. In this lecture, Mark Philip Bradley chronicles the complex histories that have formed our contemporary understanding of human rights and illustrates how that understanding has become a force behind international and local politics. In particular, he addresses the Indian Supreme Court’s decision last December to uphold Section 377, the colonial-era law that criminalizes sexual activities “against the order of nature,” most notably, gay sex.
Mark Philip Bradley is the Bernadotte E. Schmitt Professor of International History in the Department of History and the College, chair of the Committee on International Relations, and faculty director of the Pozen Family Center for Human Rights at the University of Chicago. He is the author and coeditor of several books, including the forthcoming “The United States and the Global Human Rights Imagination” and “Familiar Made Strange: American Icons and Artifacts after the Transnational Turn.”

A conversation on Indian Elections, part 3 
April 11, 2014
A Conversation on Democracy in India, part 3. Navin Chawla, former Chief Election Commissioner of India, discusses the commission's goals & methods. This was part of a UChicago Center in Delhi event on April 11, 2014, which included UChicago Political Science Professors John Mark Hansen and Gerald Rosenberg.