Two Poets: Part II

5:00–7:00 pm
UChicago Center in Delhi

Nov.
18

Following a successful poetry reading and roundtable discussion on contemporary Anglophone Indian poetry at the Center last year, this event expanded and extended the dialogue with Indian literary scholars and poets in Delhi over the coming years.

Cole Swensen is one of the leading poets of her generation in contemporary American poetry whose work revolves around the relationship between people and the natural world; she has written works on formal parks, landscape, and walking, among other subjects. She will be reading from her most recent collection, Landscapes on a Train, as well as from two upcoming books, On Walking On and Gave. The author of 15 volumes of poetry and one of critical essays, Swensen teaches at Brown University. Her other work includes Gravesend (University of California Press, 2012), finalist for the LA Times Book Prize in Poetry; The Glass Age (Alice James Books, 2007); The Book of a Hundred Hands (University of Iowa Press, 2005); Goest (Alice James Books, 2004), finalist for the National Book Award; Such Rich Hour (University of Iowa Press, 2001); Oh (Apogee Press, 2000); Try (University of Iowa Press, 1999), winner of the Iowa Poetry Prize and winner of the San Francisco State Poetry Center Book Award; Noon (Sun & Moon Press, 1997), winner of the New American Writing Award; Numen (Burning Deck Press, 1995), a finalist for the PEN West Award in Poetry; and New Math(William Morrow & Co., 1988), winner of the National Poetry Series. Her translations of contemporary French poetry include Physis (2007, by Nicolas Pesquès); Future, Former, Fugitive (2004, by Olivier Cadiot); Oxo (2004, by Pierre Alferi ); Island of the Dead (2002, Jean Frémon) which was awarded the 2004 PEN USA Award for Literary Translation; Bayart (2001, by Pascalle Monnier); Art Poetic (1999, by Olivier Cadiot).

Rukmini Bhaya Nair is a celebrated poet and scholar. She is the Professor of Linguistics and English at the Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi in the Department of Humanities and Social Sciences, and served as its Head from 2006 to 2009. Nair was Visiting Professor at the Department of English, Stanford University, in 2005-2006 and has also taught at the Jawaharlal Nehru University, the National University of Singapore and the University of Washington at Seattle. Academic books by Nair include Technobrat: Culture in a Cybernetic Classroom (Harper Collins, 1997); Narrative Gravity: Conversation, Cognition, Culture (Oxford University Press and Routledge, London and New York, 2003); Lying on the Postcolonial Couch: the Idea of Indifference (Minnesota University Press and Oxford University Press, India, 2002); as well as an edited volume,Translation, Text and Theory: the Paradigm of India (Sage, 2002). Nair, who has been called “the first significant post-modern poet in Indian English,” has published three books of poetry: The Hyoid Bone and The Ayodhya Cantos and Yellow Hibiscus (Penguin, 1992, 1999, 2004). In 1990, Nair received the first prize in the All India Poetry Society/ British Council competition. is one of the leading poets of her generation in contemporary American poetry whose work revolves around the relationship between people and the natural world; she has written works on formal parks, landscape, and walking, among other subjects. She will be reading from her most recent collection, Landscapes on a Train, as well as from two upcoming books, On Walking On and Gave. The author of 15 volumes of poetry and one of critical essays, Swensen teaches at Brown University. Her other work includes Gravesend (University of California Press, 2012), finalist for the LA Times Book Prize in Poetry; The Glass Age (Alice James Books, 2007); The Book of a Hundred Hands (University of Iowa Press, 2005); Goest (Alice James Books, 2004), finalist for the National Book Award; Such Rich Hour (University of Iowa Press, 2001); Oh (Apogee Press, 2000); Try (University of Iowa Press, 1999), winner of the Iowa Poetry Prize and winner of the San Francisco State Poetry Center Book Award; Noon (Sun & Moon Press, 1997), winner of the New American Writing Award; Numen (Burning Deck Press, 1995), a finalist for the PEN West Award in Poetry; and New Math(William Morrow & Co., 1988), winner of the National Poetry Series. Her translations of contemporary French poetry include Physis (2007, by Nicolas Pesquès); Future, Former, Fugitive (2004, by Olivier Cadiot); Oxo (2004, by Pierre Alferi ); Island of the Dead (2002, Jean Frémon) which was awarded the 2004 PEN USA Award for Literary Translation; Bayart (2001, by Pascalle Monnier); Art Poetic (1999, by Olivier Cadiot).

Rukmini Bhaya Nair is a celebrated poet and scholar. She is the Professor of Linguistics and English at the Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi in the Department of Humanities and Social Sciences, and served as its Head from 2006 to 2009. Nair was Visiting Professor at the Department of English, Stanford University, in 2005-2006 and has also taught at the Jawaharlal Nehru University, the National University of Singapore and the University of Washington at Seattle. Academic books by Nair include Technobrat: Culture in a Cybernetic Classroom (Harper Collins, 1997); Narrative Gravity: Conversation, Cognition, Culture (Oxford University Press and Routledge, London and New York, 2003); Lying on the Postcolonial Couch: the Idea of Indifference (Minnesota University Press and Oxford University Press, India, 2002); as well as an edited volume,Translation, Text and Theory: the Paradigm of India (Sage, 2002). Nair, who has been called “the first significant post-modern poet in Indian English,” has published three books of poetry: The Hyoid Bone and The Ayodhya Cantos and Yellow Hibiscus (Penguin, 1992, 1999, 2004). In 1990, Nair received the first prize in the All India Poetry Society/ British Council competition.