Past Events: 2019

May
17

This talk by Borislav Gerasimov will discuss that in order to prevent trafficking, India’s anti-trafficking legislation must be formulated in consultation with various groups of workers, especially those in the unorganised sector, including but not exclusively, sex workers. And anti-trafficking initiatives must address the root causes and be grounded in an understanding of trafficking as a social justice issue lying at the intersections of gender, migration, labour, and development. Unlike many other countries, India has not yet created specific anti-trafficking legislation. Anti-trafficking initiatives, both by state and non-state actors, have seen a steady increase in India over the last two decades, as in other parts of the world. So we see in India a stronger accent on the crime of trafficking and measures to control it. Efforts to ‘rescue’ and ‘rehabilitate’ victims have become more aggressive without paying any heed to human rights violations that routinely occur in the process of providing such ‘assistance’. As the ITPA recognises only trafficking into the sex sector, sex workers bear the brunt of the excesses of the anti-trafficking industry.


Efforts to intervene into situations of egregious exploitation through direct rescue play an important role in anti-trafficking programmes across the globe. In some instances, rescue is legally required whether one has consented to work in that sector or not. India’s Immoral Trafficking (Prevention) Act (ITPA) has targeted cisgender women who sell sexual services for rescue since the early days of independence, regardless of whether they work voluntarily or under direct force. Recently Parliament considered a new anti-trafficking bill that would expand this rescue mandate beyond the sale of sexual services to other situations as well. While on its face a directive to rescue victims of trafficking is clearly laudable, research suggests that forced rescue and detention in specific should both be closely examined and reconsidered as solutions to the severe problems of human trafficking. Disrupting Traffick? provides a forum for researchers, policy makers, heads of protection homes, human rights experts, activists, and those who have experienced rescue and rehabilitation interventions to share with each other their perspectives on the present use of the ITPA and Sec 370 and 370A and together outline a way forward.


Revitalising Yamuna - Alternate Imaginations

4:30–7:00 pm
UChicago Center in Delhi

May
11

This event held in collaboration with the Tata Centre for Development at UChicago and the Centre for Community Knowledge, Ambedkar University Delhi, will comprise a series of activities such as photo exhibition on people living along the Yamuna in Delhi, screening of a documentary on the communities, and a panel discussion—is aimed at understanding connections and disconnections between the river and the residents of the city, and how the Yamuna has changed over time – from its course to pollution load?


Physicians around the world play a major role in shaping and influencing health policy. However, few researchers have systematically explored organized medicine in the context of developing countries, including India. In the increasingly globalized world of biomedicine, there are considerable lessons and ideas to be drawn from examining the experiences of organized medicine and policymaking in different countries. This public lecture brings together academics, practitioners and others interested in the role of professional medical associations as key stakeholders in shaping health policy. Our panelists will draw on exciting new research from India and the U.S that explores the role of these associations in shaping contemporary policy debates. We will examine critical questions in the context of dynamic policy environments in both countries - whose voices do the associations represent? How do they engage with policymakers and the policy process? And, what is the future for these associations in the face of growing corporatization and patient activation? 


Professional medical associations are considered key stakeholders in shaping and influencing health policy. Yet, there has been limited research and discussion on their role in the context of low- and middle-income countries. In the increasingly globalized world of biomedicine, there are considerable lessons and ideas to be drawn from examining the experiences of organized medicine and policymaking across countries. In this workshop, we will share new research on the role of professional medical associations in policymaking, and discuss the experiences of practitioners in influencing policy. In two interactive sessions, panelists will share their research and experiences, and as a group, we will discuss emerging themes, methodological challenges, and ideas for further research and action. 


Demystifying Social Impact Careers: Conference Series

Time TBA
UChicago Center in Delhi

Apr.
24

All around the world, more and more people are questioning traditional career paths and wondering how they can set up their careers so that they don’t have to choose between making a living and making a difference. Indians are no exception. And yet, it is still unclear what one’s options are if one doesn’t want to follow the traditional routes and wants to work towards making the country, and the world, a better place.

In India especially, there is still a prevailing mentality that social sector careers necessarily mean self-sacrifices and low prestige. But this does not take into account the wide growth in options in the social sector in recent years – from social enterprises to
impact investing to fellowship programs to even traditional NGOs offering better opportunities than in the past.

 


Creative Criticality in Colonial and Indigenous Archives

Through April 23, 2019
UChicago Center in Delhi

Begins
Apr. 22

As the discipline of postcolonial studies has expanded beyond nationalist frameworks of analysis, new paradigms have emerged for understanding the cultural and political agency of minority, indigenous, and otherwise subordinated people. This workshop proposes to investigate such paradigms of cultural agency in a comparatist framework, bringing together a conversation about how writers, artists, and scholars are engaging colonial and indigenous archives in the contexts of the Americas, South Asia, and Australia in bold, daring, and creatively agential ways. In this regard, the central question that this workshop proposes to ask is: how do the contents of these archives change when cast in the forms of alternative, indigenous, and minoritized knowledge systems. Over the course of two days, participants will engage this problem of the archive via reconsiderations of such topics as caste-class-race divides, translation, alternative historicities/pasts/temporalities, global indigeneity, and archival technology. These participants will represent a broad range of regional knowledge-bases, including scholars from Kolkota, Bangalore, Dhaka, Nepal, Australia, and the Americas (North America, Mexico, and Central America).   


Undergraduate Information Session

6:00–7:30 pm
UChicago Center in Delhi

Apr.
4

Please join representatives from Johns Hopkins University, Barnard College, and the University of Chicago for a joint public information session about undergraduate admissions to highly selecting U.S. colleges and universities. This presentation will feature information on academics, student life, and the application process, and will be followed by an opportunity to ask questions of representatives of all three schools.


Connection Series: Bhakti Ke Tin Svar / Three Bhakti Voices

5:00–7:00 pm
UChicago Center in Delhi

Mar.
27

Bhakti or ‘devotion’—as a religious concept and practice, as a literary and aesthetic program, and as a social and political ‘movement’—vastly changed the cultural landscape of India in the medieval and early modern periods and continues to shape the way that many people in India (and other South Asian countries) understand the world and their place in it. Through their poetry and their life stories the poet-saints Mirabai, Kabir, and Surdas have become so closely associated with bhakti that their fame has spread among devotees all over the subcontinent, including those far from northern India where these saints are believed to have lived. At the same time they have also become important figures in the more general historical and cultural consciousness of the independent Indian nation as they provide ways to think through questions of morality, duty, individual, and community.


Climate Change and the Human Sciences

2:45–3:45 pm
St. Stephen's College

Mar.
26

In this talk, Professor Chakrabarty will discuss the various responses that scholars in the social sciences have had to the phenomenon of anthropogenic climate change and will focus in particular on the social significance of debates on the idea of the Anthropocene, the proposed new name of the geological epoch we may be passing through.


Mar.
25

The main objective of this conclave organized by Dipesh Chakrabarty, Lawrence A Kimpton Distinguished Service Professor of History, South Asian Languages and Civilizations, and the College; Faculty Director, UChicago Center in Delhi, is to brainstorm about how climate change is being discussed and responded to in India by various stakeholders including scientists, policy people, science communicators, the media, activists, and social groups and communities. 


International Innovation Corps 2019 Cohort Training

Through March 29, 2019
UChicago Center in Delhi

Begins
Mar. 25

International Innovation Corps (IIC), a program based at the University of Chicago Harris School of Public Policy, will conduct a two week training program for its 2019-2020 cohort of fellows at the Center. This training program will be led by faculty and staff from the University of Chicago, as well as local experts and Government officials. The IIC fellows will be working in teams on 13-month projects with the Indian Government and other key stakeholders tackling contemporary developmental challenges.
 


Graduate Information Session in Social Sciences

11:00 am–12:30 pm
United States-India Educational Foundation (USIEF), New Delhi

Mar.
23

Since its founding in 1890, the University of Chicago has been at the forefront of social scientific disciplines. Graduate programs, including 5 master's degrees and 9 PhD programs, range from Anthropology, Economics, History, and International Relations to Computational Social Science, Sociology, and Political Science. Learn more from Michael Reese and Matthias Staisch about the programs offered, UChicago's unique intellectual environment, and the admissions process. 


Graduate Information Session in Social Sciences

2:45–3:45 pm
United States-India Educational Foundation (USIEF) Maker Bhavan 1, 2nd Floor, Churchgate (E), Mumbai 400020

Mar.
20

Since its founding in 1890, the University of Chicago has been at the forefront of social scientific disciplines. Graduate programs, including 5 master's degrees and 9 PhD programs, range from Anthropology, Economics, History, and International Relations to Computational Social Science, Sociology, and Political Science. Learn more from Michael Reese and Matthias Staisch about the programs offered, UChicago's unique intellectual environment, and the admissions process. 


Chintan and Friedrich Ebert Foundation, in collaboration with the Energy Policy Institute at the University of Chicago (EPIC India) and the Tata Centre for Development (TCD), are hosting an international conference on waste reduction and enhanced livelihoods. The objective is to bring together major global and domestic players to share their work, ideas and successes around the theme of waste reduction, circular economy and livelihoods. 


Committee on International Relations Visit 2019

Through March 26, 2019
Mumbai and Delhi

Begins
Mar. 15

The Committee on International Relations (CIR) will offer its students an intensive week-long seminar on Asian international relations at the University of Chicago’s Center in Delhi in March 2019. It will include opportunities to meet South Asian scholars and international relations practitioners from the Indian government and regional think tanks, who will provide guest lectures on such issues as security, international political economy, human rights and climate change.


Harris Admitted Students Dinner

5:00–9:00 pm
UChicago Center in Delhi

Mar.
7

The Center in Delhi hosted the annual welcome reception for the newly admitted students to the University of Chicago Harris School of Public Policy. Newly admitted members of the graduate divisions, and their families were welcomed to the UChicago family by the UChicagoGRAD, alumni, and staff. 


Jharkhand signs up for better monitoring of industrial air pollution

Time TBA
Jharkhand State Pollution Control Board (JSPCB), Jharkhand

Mar.
2

In a decisive step to improve monitoring for industrial emissions, the Jharkhand State Pollution Control Board (JSPCB), signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with the University of Chicago Trust (UC Trust) making way for the announcement of a star rating program for industries in the state. The UC Trust through Tata Centre for Development (TCD) and Energy Policy Institute at the University of Chicago (EPIC India) will support JSPCB in rolling out the star rating program that categorizes industries from 1-star to 5-stars, with 1-star being the least compliant and 5-stars being the most compliant to pollution standards set by the regulator.


Reimagining Teacher Training in India

9:30 am–4:30 pm
UChicago Center in Delhi

Mar.
1

An analysis of teacher training policies in 25 countries reveals that teacher quality is the most important factor affecting student achievement among school-related factors. Adopting a systems-reform lens further cements this fact - certain education systems achieve substantially better outcomes than others by “getting more talented people to become teachers, developing these teachers into better instructors, and ensuring that these instructors deliver consistently for every child in the system.” Teacher capacity building thus becomes an important area of the education reform agenda that governments and private resources should target in a well thought-out manner. What would it take to prepare and motivate teachers to ensure that students learn and learn well every time when they are in the school? If technology is the way ahead, how is the government school system setting teachers up to successfully leverage it - before and during the job span?


The historical development of Hindi metrical rhythm

5:30–7:00 pm
UChicago Center in Delhi

Feb.
19

Hindi, one of the major New Indo-Aryan Languages, has a tradition of verse literature for at least five centuries. The science of meter goes back to the late Vedic period, and Hindi metrics, which started in the 16th century, follows the framework and terminology of Sanskrit metrics. While the meter is defined mainly in terms of the syllable in Sanskrit metrics, new meter defined by the mora became prevalent during the Prakrit-Apabhramsa period. While any metrical form can be applied to Hindi whether it is derived from Sanskrit, Prakrit or Apabhramsa, mora-based metrical forms are much more common in Hindi. One of the possible reasons is that the rhythmic and phonotactic restriction of Hindi are more compatible with the moraic meter. Kings and Mughal emperors patronized poets to compile books of metre especially for Hindi poetry. The metrical rhythm of Hindi is not the same as that of Prakrit-Apabhramsa, but early authors of Hindi metrics ignore that fact. As a result, some of the metrical forms they define are taken over from Prakrit metrics even though those metrical forms actually do not align well with the word boundaries of Hindi. The science of Hindi metre has not been studied well, and we still need to edit manuscripts of early Hindi metre.


Feb.
17

This event sets out to challenge the assumption that disability in India should be understood and responded to as a rights-based category. As a (post) development state with transnational political and economic ties, India provides an ideal location to explore how global discourses are taken up, adapted, or rejected as disabled people seek to create worlds for themselves.


Workshop on Disentangling Disability and Human Rights

Time TBA
UChicago Center in Delhi

Begins
Feb. 15

This workshop and conference sets out to challenge the assumption that disability in India should be understood and responded to as a rights-based category. As a (post) development state with transnational political and economic ties, India provides an ideal location to explore how global discourses are taken up, adapted, or rejected as disabled people seek to create worlds for themselves.


Disability-inclusive Compassionate Care

10:00 am–5:00 pm
UChicago Center in Delhi

Feb.
9

Taking into consideration the recommendations of the World Report and UNConvention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UNCRPD), an Indo-US collaboration - between Bucksbaum Institute for Clinical Excellence, University of Chicago and the Medical Humanities Group of University College of Medical Sciences, Delhi -collaborated with Doctors with Disabilities, Disability Rights Activists, and Health Professions Educators in India to develop a consensus on the disability competencies that should be acquired by health professionals during training so that they can provide quality and equitable care to patients with disabilities.


I-House Alumni Meet

4:00–6:00 pm
UChicago Center in Delhi

Jan.
31

Interntational Houses Worldwide cordially invites I-House alumni and friends to join in the 10th stop on Alice Lewthwaite's Grains of Sand Tour. 


Information Session: Graduate Studies in the Humanities

5:00–6:30 pm
American Center, Kolkata

Jan.
24

Join Professor Tyler Williams, Assistant Professor, South Asian Languages and Civilizations at the University of Chicago, for an informational session about the wide range of graduate programs in the Humanities Division at the University of Chicago.


TATA Steel Kolkata Literary Meet 2019

Through January 27, 2019
Kolkata

Begins
Jan. 22

UChicago Faculty Members: Professors Jason Grunebaum, Vu Tran, and Tyler Williams will be speaking at TATA Steel Kolkata Literary Meet at various sessions between January 22-27, 2019. 


International Innovation Corps Information Session

5:00–7:00 pm
UChicago Center in Delhi

Jan.
17

The International Innovation Corps identifies scalable, sustainable interventions that impact some of the most pressing social and economic challenges. IIC send teams of Project Associates from top universities from India and around the world to implement projects with the government in India. 


This roundtable, hosted by the Tata Centre for Development at UChicago in collaboration with International Innovation Corps, will deliberate on a wide range of issues related to water quality monitoring. Researchers, policy advocates, and on-the-ground practitioners will come together to discuss how to create actionable data on water pollution, influence policy, and boost India’s potential to fight pollution in its rivers. At a time when there is an enormous need for monitoring and mapping water quality at high spatial and temporal resolution, this roundtable gives a platform to discuss the future of gathering and disseminating water quality data. The roundtable will also explore opportunities to collaborate on creating a common platform to address water quality challenges.
 


This panel discussion will examine the bilateral relationship between India and The United States both from an historical perspective and with a look ahead to the future. The panel will discuss and debate what the past seventy years has meant for the India - US partnership and will look ahead to prospects and challenges for the future. This event will be held in association with International House at the University of Chicago, Indo - American Friendship Association, UChicago Delhi Center and India Habitat Centre.


Jan.
4

This annual conference held in collaboration with American Institute of Indian Studies (AIIS) will bring together AIIS pre-doctoral Research Fellows pursuing archival and field research throughout India. The Fellows share reports on their ongoing projects, and also receive feedback from senior scholar-mentors. This rich celebration of emerging scholarship in a range of disciplines will, this year, include a talk by Geeta Wahi Dua and Brijendra Dua on Ecological Map of Delhi and its potential for urban planning/sustainability.

 


Call for Proposals 2019-2020

Through January 15, 2019

Begins
Nov. 1

The University of Chicago Center in Delhi welcomes proposals for collaborative research projects and other related activities for the 2019-2020 academic year.  Proposals are due January 15, 2019 for projects beginning from July 1, 2019 to June 30, 2020.